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NCLEX Question of the Day: Ulcerative Colitis

Osmosis Team
Published on Jun 23, 2021. Updated on Jun 23, 2021.

Today's NCLEX-RN® question of the day focuses on a client with a history of ulcerative colitis. Can you figure it out?

A client with a history of ulcerative colitis is brought to the emergency department. When assessing the client, which clinical finding should require immediate intervention by the nurse?

A. Nausea

B. Oral temperature of 100.6 F (38 C)

C. Elevated white blood cell (WBC) count

D. Abdominal rebound tenderness

Scroll down for the correct answer!


The correct answer to today's NCLEX-RN® Question is...

D. Abdominal rebound tenderness

Rationale: Rebound tenderness is an indication of peritonitis secondary to bowel perforation, a potentially life-threatening complication of ulcerative colitis. Nausea and increased temperature should be managed, and the nurse should include WBC count monitoring in the plan of care, but these are not the priority problems for this client.

Main takeaway

Rebound tenderness is an indication of peritonitis secondary to bowel perforation, a potentially life-threatening complication of ulcerative colitis.


Incorrect answer explanations

A. Nausea

Rationale: Nausea should be managed for client comfort but this is not the priority problem.

B. Oral temperature of 100.6 F (38 C)

Rationale: An elevated temperature may be present during acute attacks of ulcerative colitis, but this is not the priority problem.

C. Elevated white blood cell (WBC) count

Rationale: The nurse should include WBC count monitoring in the plan of care, but this is not the priority problem.

Reference

Lewis, S. L., Dirksen, S. R., Heitkemper, M. M. & Bucher, L. (2017). Medical-surgical nursing: Assessment and management of clinical problems (10th ed.)St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Mosby.

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