Study Tips

NCLEX® QOTD: Eye drops

Osmosis Team
Published on Jan 10, 2024. Updated on Dec 15, 2023.

Today's NCLEX-RN® question of the day focuses on a nurse gathering the health history of a patient prescribed an eye drop for glaucoma. With the patient unsure of the medication's name, the nurse turns to the electronic health record (EHR) for clues. Can you identify the likely glaucoma treatment in the medication list as the nurse navigates this crucial moment in patient care?

The nurse is gathering health history data from a patient in the emergency department. The patient states, “I was just prescribed an eye drop to treat my glaucoma, but I don’t know the name of it.” The nurse reviews the patient’s home medication list in the electronic health record (EHR). 

Which medication in the list is the patient most likely referring to?


Home Medications

Lisinopril 10 mg, PO, daily

Metoprolol 12.5 mg, PO, daily

Enoxaparin 30 mg, subcutaneous, daily

Diclofenac 1% gel, 4 g, topical, every 12 hours PRN for pain

Ciprofloxacin 0.2% otic solution, 2 drops, bilaterally, twice daily

Timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution, 1 drop, bilaterally, twice daily

Nitroglycerin 0.4 mcg, sublingual, every 5 minutes PRN for chest pain


Scroll down for the correct answer!

The correct answer to today's NCLEX-RN® Question is...

Home Medications

Lisinopril 10 mg, oral, daily

Metoprolol 12.5 mg, oral, daily

Enoxaparin 30 mg, subcutaneous, daily

Diclofenac 1% gel, 4 g, topical, every 12 hours as needed for pain

Ciprofloxacin 0.2% otic solution, 2 drops, bilaterally, twice daily

Timolol 0.5% ophthalmic solution, 1 drop, bilaterally, twice daily

Nitroglycerin 0.4 mcg, sublingual, every 5 minutes as needed for chest pain

Major Takeaway

There are several different routes for medication administration. The most common routes are oral, also known as PO; parenteral, which includes intravenous, or IV, intramuscular, or IM, subcutaneous; and intradermal. Other routes for medication administration include inhalation, sublingual, rectal, as well as topical gels, creams, ointments, or patches that are applied to the surface of the skin. Otic solutions are administered in the external ear, whereas ophthalmic solutions are applied to the eyes, such as eye drops for treatment of glaucoma.

                                                         ________________________

Want more NCLEX®-style practice questions? Try Osmosis by Elsevier today! Access your free trial and find out why millions of current and future clinicians and caregivers love learning with us.

Osmosis ad to create an account