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Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus

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Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus

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High Yield Notes
22 pages
Flashcards

Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus

8 flashcards
Questions

USMLE® Step 1 style questions USMLE

3 questions
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A 35-year-old man comes to his general practitioner for examination of an erythematous rash on his foot that appeared three days prior. He says that the rash began about a week after taking a day trip to the beach, and complains that the rash is extremely itchy. His medical history is noncontributory. The rash is shown below. Which of the following is the most likely causal organism?

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Summary
Necator americanus is a species of hookworm that lives in the small intestine of hosts such as humans, dogs, and cats. Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus are the two human hookworms that are discussed together as the cause of hookworm infection. These worms can cause anemia in affected patients by biting and sucking blood from the intestinal wall. Transmission occurs when larvae penetrate the skin, typically when patients walk barefoot on contaminated sand or soil. This may cause cutaneous larva migrans, characterized by a serpiginous, pruritic rash near the site of penetration. Treatment is with bendazoles, pyrantel pamoate, or ivermectin.