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Osteochondroma

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Musculoskeletal system

Pathology

Pediatric musculoskeletal conditions
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Osteochondroma

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High Yield Notes
4 pages
Flashcards

Osteochondroma

9 flashcards
Questions

USMLE® Step 1 style questions USMLE

1 questions
Preview

A 14-year-old boy comes to the clinic with his parents due to knee pain. During the past few months, the patient noticed a non-painful bump on the right knee that has progressively grown in size. Last week, he fell on the same location and endorses pain at the site. Vitals are within normal limits. On physical examination, a bony bump is noted on the right knee with overlying lacerated skin and crusted blood. The patient is able to bear weight without pain. The range of motion is full, strength is 5/5, and sensation is intact. A CT of the knee is obtained and shown below:  


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The patient is prepared for surgery. Which of the following is most likely to be found on pathohistological examination of this patient’s lesion?  

External References
Summary

Osteochondromas is a common benign bone tumor developing in the epiphysis of a long bone. It is characterized by cartilage-capped bony outgrowth (exostoses) on the surface of bones. Osteochondromas most commonly affect long bones in the leg, pelvis, or scapula. Even though it's a benign tumor, it can present with complications like pathologic fractures, bone malformation, or compression of nearby neurovascular structures.