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Shaken baby syndrome

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Nervous system

Pathology

Central nervous system disorders
Central and peripheral nervous system disorders
Peripheral nervous system disorders
Autonomic nervous system disorders
Nervous system pathology review

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Shaken baby syndrome

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High Yield Notes
5 pages
Flashcards

Shaken baby syndrome

8 flashcards
Questions

USMLE® Step 1 style questions USMLE

3 questions
Preview

A 6-month-old boy is brought into the emergency department by his parent following a motor vehicle accident. The parent states they were stopped at an intersection when another car hit hers in the rear. The patient was restrained in a car seat during the accident. At arrival, the patient’s temperature is 37.6°C (99.7°F), blood pressure is 95/47 mmHg, and pulse is 109/min. Weight is at the 10th percentile and height is at the 60th percentile. The patient is inconsolable by his parent. Physical examination reveals several bruises over the trunk and extremities at different stages of healing, which the parent attributes to falls that occurred while he was learning to walk. There is significant tenderness over the right leg and any manipulation of the extremity causes pain. Imaging reveals a spiral fracture of the femur. Which of the following is the most likely cause of this patient’s symptoms?  

External References
Summary
Shaken baby syndrome is a constellation of medical findings: subdural hematoma, retinal bleeding, and brain swelling from which physicians, consistent with current medical understanding, infer child abuse caused by violent shaking. In a majority of cases there is no visible sign of external injury. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identifies SBS as "an injury to the skull or intracranial contents of an infant or young child (< 5 years of age) due to inflicted blunt impact and/or violent shaking".