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Topical antifungals: Nursing Pharmacology

Notes

Notes

TOPICAL ANTIFUNGALS
DRUG NAME
nystatin (Nystop), tavaborole (Kerydin), ciclopirox (Loprox), ketoconazole (Extina), miconazole (Fungold), 
econazole (Ecoza), efinaconazole (Jublia)
CLASS
Topical antifungals
MECHANISM OF ACTION
Disrupting and damaging the fungal cell membrane → fungistatic or fungicidal action
INDICATIONS
Cutaneous fungal infections (skin, hair, nail)
ROUTE(S) OF ADMINISTRATION
TOP
SIDE EFFECTS
  • Skin rash
  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome
CONTRAINDICATIONS AND CAUTIONS
None
NURSING CONSIDERATIONS
Assessment and monitoring
  • Assess the affected area
    • Moist, red patches, papules, pustules, discharge
    • Itching, burning, pain
    • Laboratory results: skin scrapings
  • Monitor for side effects
  • Assess understanding of medication self-administration
  • Evaluate therapeutic effect

Client education
  • Purpose of medication: treat fungal skin infection
  • Self-administration
    • Wash hands before and after application
    • Clean the area with mild soap and water
    • Gently pat dry with a clean towel
    • Apply antifungal cream in a thin layer, exactly as directed
  • Topical use only; not for oral, ophthalmic, or vaginal use
  • Report skin irritation, burning, or painful rash that worsens; if infection does not resolve
Sources
  1. "Focus on Nursing Pharmacology" LWW (2019)
  2. "Pharmacology: A patient-centered nursing process approach (8e)" Elsevier Health Sciences (2014)
  3. "Mosby's 2021 Nursing Drug Reference" Mosby (2021)
  4. "Saunders Comprehensive Review for the NCLEX-RN Examination" Saunders (2020)
  5. "Goodman & Gilman's: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics (13e)" McGraw-Hill Education (2018)