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Trichomonas vaginalis

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Trichomonas vaginalis

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High Yield Notes
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Flashcards

Trichomonas vaginalis

11 flashcards
Questions

USMLE® Step 1 style questions USMLE

4 questions

USMLE® Step 2 style questions USMLE

4 questions
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A 19-year-old woman comes to the clinic with a history of burning micturition, increased frequency of urination, and malodorous vaginal discharge. She is sexually active with three sexual partners. Her male partner does not use condoms when engaging in vaginal intercourse. Temperature is 37.0°C (98.6°F), pulse is 90/min, respirations are 20/min, and blood pressure is 120/75 mmHg. The patient’s abdomen is soft and nontender. Speculum examination reveals purulent, malodorous discharge and a friable, erythematous cervix with punctate hemorrhages. Cervical motion tenderness is absent on bimanual examination. The pH of the vaginal discharge is 5.5. An external genital examination is unremarkable.  Which of the following findings is likely to be seen on further laboratory evaluation?  

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Summary
Trichomonas vaginalis is an anaerobic, flagellated protozoan parasite and the causative agent of trichomoniasis. It is the most common pathogenic protozoan infection of humans in industrialized countries. Infection rates between men and women are similar with women being symptomatic, while infections in men are usually asymptomatic. Transmission usually occurs via direct, skin-to-skin contact with an infected individual, most often through vaginal intercourse. Usually treatment consists of metronidazole and tinidazole. Patients present with a foul-smelling, greenish  discharge; itching and burning; and "strawberry cervix"; vaginal pH will be >4.5.