Anticoagulants: Warfarin

Video information

Content Reviewer

Author

Sean Watts

Illustrator

Ursula Florjanczyk

Voice

Evan Debevec-McKenney

Editor

Marisa Pedron

Last updated

07-31-2019

Citation

Osmosis: Anticoagulants: Warfarin. (2019, August 18). Retrieved from (https://www.osmosis.org/learn/Anticoagulants:_Warfarin).

Warfarin is an anticoagulant normally used in the prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism. Its mechanism of action is to interfere with the γ-carboxylation of vitamin K–dependent clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X, and proteins C and S. Some adverse effects include bleeding and skin necrosis. Warfarin has several drug-drug interactions since it is metabolized by a common CYP 450 enzyme in the liver. Vitamin K can be given to reverse warfarin's anticoagulation effects, however, fresh frozen plasma is given in more rapid and urgent situations.